Studio e approfondimento della lingua inglese
 

listening comprehension

ngs 5 Set 2017 13:06
Hi everyone,

my Achilles' heel had always been listening comprehension, even though
my pronunciation was already quite good, according to our Joe (*) and
other native speakers.

(*) You listened to a recording of mine which I sent to this newsgroup.
It was about "Conformity".

I thought that listening comprehension and pronunciation were somewhat
related, but I've just come to realize that that's not necessarily the
case. This also explains why a guy I know with a very bad pronunciation
could understand English on a very noisy background much better than me
(I just caught some word here and there).

I had been watching TV series for years and my listening skills hadn't
improve as much as I would've liked, at least not until last month.

One simple thing happened: I created a study group on discord (a *******
server) for students and researchers of AI (artificial intelligence) and
I was soon overwhelmed by messages, questions, proposal, complaints,
introductions, etc...

(I had done something similar before but on a newsgroup. It didn't make
any difference even after 3 months. A ******* is different!)

The first days were a nightmare because I simply couldn't keep up with
the pace of the group. Then something happened: out of pure desperation,
I stopped caring about grammar mistakes, typos, and, above all, I
stopped editing my messages unless I was asked for clarifications. I cut
down the time it took me to answer to people by at least 10 times!

To my great suprise, yesterday I listened to some English music and I
realized I was able to understand 99% of the words, whereas a month ago
I could barely recognize a couple of sentences here and there.

I'd never have thought that chatting (no voice!) would help with my
listening skills to such a dramatic extent!

I have an easy explanation which is based on my studies in AI. Listening
is an inference problem, which means that a successful listener must be
able to predict with good accuracy what's coming next.
Moreover, listeners often "hallucinates" (technical term) sounds which
were never uteered by the speaker (that's why they don't even realize
they drop lots of "sounds" when they speak).
To add to the complexity of the task, predictions must be both *fast*
and *accurate*, but if one has to choose, *fast and inaccurate* is
better than *slow but accurate*.

TL;DR Frenetic chatting could boost your listening comprehension
considerably!

Kiuhnm
Fathermckenzie 5 Set 2017 21:45
Il 05/09/2017 13:06, ngs ha scritto:

> TL;DR Frenetic chatting could boost your listening comprehension
> considerably!

Più o meno ho lo stesso problema, non sarò un drago a parlare ma mi
faccio capire, a tradurre uno scritto me la cavo bene, ma non c'è verso
di capire il parlato. E no, benché abbia fatto in passato ******* (su IRC,
ICQ e varie) da queste non ho tratto giovamento. Le canzoni a volte le
capisco, dipende dal cantante, o se ho almeno una vaga idea
dell'argomento. Se ho visto anche di sfuggita una sola volta la
traduzione le parole mi si materializzano improvvisamente.


--
Et interrogabant eum turbae dicentes: “Quid ergo faciemus?”.
Respondens autem dicebat illis: “Qui habet duas tunicas,
det non habenti; et, qui habet escas, similiter faciat”.
(Ev. sec. Lucam 3,10-11)
Tony the Ice Man 6 Set 2017 04:23
On 09/05/17 4:06 AM, ngs wrote:
> ... Then something happened: out of pure desperation,
> I stopped caring about grammar mistakes, typos, and, above all, I
> stopped editing my messages unless I was asked for clarifications.

This is a commonly accepted technique. You need to, when appropriate,
stop worrying about being correct and focus on communicating. The
suppression of the "editor" in you allows you to engage your intuitive
ability which adds recognition of other cues and streams your
understanding.

> I have an easy explanation which is based on my studies in AI. Listening
> is an inference problem, which means that a successful listener must be
> able to predict with good accuracy what's coming next.

This is close to an observation some have made with real intelligence.
People, pretty much, say predictable things. If you know what they'll
probably say before they say it, you barely have to listen. Just pick
out the key expected words and fill in the rest.

There's a downside to this however. A relative told me a family story
when I first met him in Italy many years ago. I thought I understood the
story, but when I revisited him I heard the story again, and knowing
more Italian I finally understood that a certain relative wasn't killed
by a Spanish soldier but by the flu.

> TL;DR Frenetic chatting could boost your listening comprehension
> considerably!

My conclusion might differ from yours a bit. I'd say, suppress the
editor in you and let your participation in the communication be more
spontaneous.

On a related point, I found that when I needed to do creative writing I
would often wait until late at night. I had always blamed this bad habit
on procrastination until I realized consciously what I had
subconsciously realized: my rational thought processes were less
dominant when I was tired and therefore I wrote more spontaneously late
at night. Now, I've integrated that disregard for an editor in every
writing task, at least for the first drafts. So, nowadays, if I wait
until late at night to write something, I'm probably just procrastinating.
Giuseppe 6 Set 2017 11:40
L'uso massiccio dei phrasal verbs nel parlato (tutti quei take on, get
along, let down ecc.) è secondo me un ostacolo alla fluidità della
comprensione, per noi italiani abituati a verbi più "consistenti".
g

---
Questa e-mail è stata controllata per individuare virus con Avast antivirus.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
giacomo.degliesposti@gmail.com 6 Set 2017 12:01
Il giorno mercoledì 6 settembre 2017 11:41:07 UTC+2, Giuseppe ha scritto:
> L'uso massiccio dei phrasal verbs nel parlato (tutti quei take on, get
> along, let down ecc.) è secondo me un ostacolo alla fluidità della
> comprensione, per noi italiani abituati a verbi più "consistenti".
> g

A me le maggiori difficolta' le crea il fatto che l'inglese ha parole
mediamente piu' corte dell'italiano e che ha molti piu' suoni vocalici.

La due cose messe insieme per me sono terribili perche' ti costringono
a pensare a tutte le possibili varianti in pochissimo tempo ed
e' molto facile capire "fischi" per "fiaschi".

Ce' una bella differenza se uno mi sta parlando di "a pin",
"a pen", "a pan", "a pun" o magari non ho capito ed era un "upon" :-)

ciao
Giacomo
ngs 6 Set 2017 14:47
On 06/09/2017 04:23, Tony the Ice Man wrote:
> There's a downside to this however. A relative told me a family story
> when I first met him in Italy many years ago. I thought I understood the
> story, but when I revisited him I heard the story again, and knowing
> more Italian I finally understood that a certain relative wasn't killed
> by a Spanish soldier but by the flu.

The predictions are also at the phoneme level. For instance, most
English speakers don't realize that they drop the th sound (as in
/truth/) before the s sound (as in /sand/). Or that they don't say "bad
guys", but almost "bagguys" with a glottal stop on the 'g'.
Non native speakers are often tripped(?) by this seemingly innocent but
very confusing interaction between words in the casual spoken language.
And then there are the more abstract predictions you're talking about
which depend on the sentence, the topic, and even the person.
If you know the language well, you don't usually need to predict too
much unless you're talking on a very noisy line or you're listening to a
bad quality recording. But you did admit you didn't know Italian as well
as you do now back then.

Sometimes I think I haven't improved at all but then I come across
something I wrote the year before or watch a ***** for the second time
and I'm shocked at my progress! I bet it's the same for everyone.

>> TL;DR Frenetic chatting could boost your listening comprehension
>> considerably!
>
> My conclusion might differ from yours a bit. I'd say, suppress the
> editor in you and let your participation in the communication be more
> spontaneous.
>
> On a related point, I found that when I needed to do creative writing I
> would often wait until late at night. I had always blamed this bad habit
> on procrastination until I realized consciously what I had
> subconsciously realized: my rational thought processes were less
> dominant when I was tired and therefore I wrote more spontaneously late
> at night. Now, I've integrated that disregard for an editor in every
> writing task, at least for the first drafts. So, nowadays, if I wait
> until late at night to write something, I'm probably just procrastinating.

That's probably why many artists have experimented with ******* in their
lives.

Kiuhnm
ngs 6 Set 2017 15:06
On 05/09/2017 21:45, Fathermckenzie wrote:
> Il 05/09/2017 13:06, ngs ha scritto:
>
>> TL;DR Frenetic chatting could boost your listening comprehension
>> considerably!
>
> Più o meno ho lo stesso problema, non sarò un drago a parlare ma mi
> faccio capire, a tradurre uno scritto me la cavo bene, ma non c'è verso
> di capire il parlato. E no, benché abbia fatto in passato ******* (su IRC,
> ICQ e varie) da queste non ho tratto giovamento. Le canzoni a volte le
> capisco, dipende dal cantante, o se ho almeno una vaga idea
> dell'argomento. Se ho visto anche di sfuggita una sola volta la
> traduzione le parole mi si materializzano improvvisamente.

Dici che hai fatto ******* ma c'è una grande differenza tra partecipare ed
essere colui che tiene le fila di tutto.
Nel mio caso, devo dirigere l'intero gruppo di stu***** di ~120 persone
prendendo decisioni riguardo al percorso di stu*****, visionare il
materiale didattico, decidere quali pubblicazioni è meglio leggere prima
o dopo, visionare i video proposti, rispondere per le rime alle teste *******
ecc...
Inoltre, almeno nei primi tempi, sono stato innondato di richieste di
spiegazioni, suggerimenti, critiche, ecc...
Ho anche avuto uno o due giorni di crisi in cui sono stato tentato di
rinunciare a tutto e di lasciar perdere. Però ho tenuto duro e adesso
sono piuttosto soddisfatto di come stanno andando le cose.
Inoltre c'ho messo la faccia perché chiunque può ricollegarmi ai miei
progetti.

Quello che voglio dire è che forse la parte "frenetica" o di
"disperazione" dove "lotti per stare a galla" è necessaria per crescere.
E' come buttare in acqua una persona che sulla carta dovrebbe saper
nuotare ma che per qualche motivo non ci riesce.

Kiuhnm
ngs 6 Set 2017 15:12
On 06/09/2017 12:01, giacomo.degliesposti@gmail.com wrote:
> Il giorno mercoledì 6 settembre 2017 11:41:07 UTC+2, Giuseppe ha scritto:
>> L'uso massiccio dei phrasal verbs nel parlato (tutti quei take on, get
>> along, let down ecc.) è secondo me un ostacolo alla fluidità della
>> comprensione, per noi italiani abituati a verbi più "consistenti".
>> g
>
> A me le maggiori difficolta' le crea il fatto che l'inglese ha parole
> mediamente piu' corte dell'italiano e che ha molti piu' suoni vocalici.

Il mio consiglio è di dimenticarsi delle parole e d'immaginarsi che sia
un flusso continuo.
Rimuovi tutti gli spazi (usa la funzione replace del tuo editor) da un
testo inglese e poi prova a leggerlo.

Questo lo voglio provare anch'io :)

Kiuhnm
giacomo.degliesposti@gmail.com 6 Set 2017 16:31
Il giorno mercoledì 6 settembre 2017 15:12:59 UTC+2, ngs ha scritto:
> On 06/09/2017 12:01, giacomo.degliesposti@gmail.com wrote:
>> Il giorno mercoledì 6 settembre 2017 11:41:07 UTC+2, Giuseppe ha scritto:
>>> L'uso massiccio dei phrasal verbs nel parlato (tutti quei take on, get
>>> along, let down ecc.) è secondo me un ostacolo alla fluidità della
>>> comprensione, per noi italiani abituati a verbi più "consistenti".
>>> g
>>
>> A me le maggiori difficolta' le crea il fatto che l'inglese ha parole
>> mediamente piu' corte dell'italiano e che ha molti piu' suoni vocalici.
>
> Il mio consiglio è di dimenticarsi delle parole e d'immaginarsi che sia
> un flusso continuo.
> Rimuovi tutti gli spazi (usa la funzione replace del tuo editor) da un
> testo inglese e poi prova a leggerlo.

In pratica porti nello scritto la stessa difficolta' del parlato,
dove molte vocali (almeno all'orecchio di un italiano) sembrano
cosi' simili fino al punto di sembrare tutti tanti '@':
H@ll@ m@ fr@nd, h@@r@@?

Puo' essere utile come allenamento per la capacita' predittiva :-)

> Questo lo voglio provare anch'io :)

Penso che aspettero' di sapere da te se funziona, prima di provarlo!!! :-)

ciao
Giacomo
ngs 6 Set 2017 21:45
On 06/09/2017 16:31, giacomo.degliesposti@gmail.com wrote:
> Il giorno mercoledì 6 settembre 2017 15:12:59 UTC+2, ngs ha scritto:
>> On 06/09/2017 12:01, giacomo.degliesposti@gmail.com wrote:
>>> Il giorno mercoledì 6 settembre 2017 11:41:07 UTC+2, Giuseppe ha scritto:
>>>> L'uso massiccio dei phrasal verbs nel parlato (tutti quei take on, get
>>>> along, let down ecc.) è secondo me un ostacolo alla fluidità della
>>>> comprensione, per noi italiani abituati a verbi più "consistenti".
>>>> g
>>>
>>> A me le maggiori difficolta' le crea il fatto che l'inglese ha parole
>>> mediamente piu' corte dell'italiano e che ha molti piu' suoni vocalici.
>>
>> Il mio consiglio è di dimenticarsi delle parole e d'immaginarsi che sia
>> un flusso continuo.
>> Rimuovi tutti gli spazi (usa la funzione replace del tuo editor) da un
>> testo inglese e poi prova a leggerlo.
>
> In pratica porti nello scritto la stessa difficolta' del parlato,
> dove molte vocali (almeno all'orecchio di un italiano) sembrano
> cosi' simili fino al punto di sembrare tutti tanti '@':
> H@ll@ m@ fr@nd, h@@r@@?
>
> Puo' essere utile come allenamento per la capacita' predittiva :-)
>
>> Questo lo voglio provare anch'io :)
>
> Penso che aspettero' di sapere da te se funziona, prima di provarlo!!! :-)

Prova anche tu: è un bel po' difficile!

(da
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/06/us/politics/house-vote-harvey-aid-debt-ceiling.html)

WASHINGTON—PresidentTrumpstruckadealwithDemocraticcongressionallead
ersonWednesdaytoincreasethedebtlimitandfinancethegovernmentuntilmid
-December,undercuttinghisownRepublic*****liesashereachedacrosstheais
letoresolveamajordisputeforthefirsttimesincetakingoffice.Theagreeme
ntwouldavertafiscalshowdownlaterthismonthwithoutthebloody,partisanb
attlethatmanyhadanticipatedbycombiningadebtceilingincreaseandstopga
pspendingmeasurewithreliefaidtoTexasandotherareasdevastatedbyHurric
aneHarvey.Butwithoutaddressingthefundamentalunderlyingissues,itsetu
ptheprospectforanevenbiggerclashattheendoftheyear.Inembracingthethr
ee-monthdeal,Mr.TrumpacceptedaDemocraticproposalthathadbeenrejected
justhoursearlierbySpeakerPaulD.RyanofWisconsin.Mr.Trump’ssnapdecisi
onataWhiteHousemeetingcaughtRepublicanleadersoffguardandreflectedfr
ictionbetweenthepresidentandhisownparty.AfterweeksofcriticizingRepu
blicanleadersforfailingtopasslegislation,Mr.Trumpsignaledthathewasw
illingtocrosspartylinestoscoresomemuch-desiredlegislativevictories.
Asiftoreinforcethatpoint,Mr.TrumpalignedhimselfwithSenatorChuckSchu
merofNewYorkandRepresentativeNancyPelosiofCalifornia,theDemocraticl
eaders,inembracinglegislationtoauthorizeyoungerillegalimmigrantstos
tayinthecountry.Adayearlier,Mr.TrumprescindedaprogramenactedbyPresi
dentBarackObamaprotectingsuchimmigrantsonthegroundsthatitwentbeyond
apresident’sauthority,butcalledonCongresstolegalizetheprogram.“Weha
daverygoodmeetingwithNancyPelosiandChuckSchumer,”Mr.Trumptoldreport
ersaboardAirForceOneenroutetoaspeechontaxesinNorthDakota,withoutmen
tioningthatMr.RyanandSenatorMitchMcConnell,theRepublicanmajoritylea
der,hadalsoattended.Regardingtheimmigrationprogram,Mr.Trumpsaid,“Ch
uckandNancywouldliketoseesomethinghappen,andsodoI.”
ngs 6 Set 2017 21:51
On 06/09/2017 21:45, ngs wrote:
> On 06/09/2017 16:31, giacomo.degliesposti@gmail.com wrote:
>> Il giorno mercoledì 6 settembre 2017 15:12:59 UTC+2, ngs ha scritto:
>>> On 06/09/2017 12:01, giacomo.degliesposti@gmail.com wrote:
>>>> Il giorno mercoledì 6 settembre 2017 11:41:07 UTC+2, Giuseppe ha
>>>> scritto:
>>>>> L'uso massiccio dei phrasal verbs nel parlato (tutti quei take on, get
>>>>> along, let down ecc.) è secondo me un ostacolo alla fluidità della
>>>>> comprensione, per noi italiani abituati a verbi più "consistenti".
>>>>> g
>>>>
>>>> A me le maggiori difficolta' le crea il fatto che l'inglese ha parole
>>>> mediamente piu' corte dell'italiano e che ha molti piu' suoni vocalici.
>>>
>>> Il mio consiglio è di dimenticarsi delle parole e d'immaginarsi che sia
>>> un flusso continuo.
>>> Rimuovi tutti gli spazi (usa la funzione replace del tuo editor) da un
>>> testo inglese e poi prova a leggerlo.
>>
>> In pratica porti nello scritto la stessa difficolta' del parlato,
>> dove molte vocali (almeno all'orecchio di un italiano) sembrano
>> cosi' simili fino al punto di sembrare tutti tanti '@':
>> H@ll@ m@ fr@nd, h@@r@@?
>>
>> Puo' essere utile come allenamento per la capacita' predittiva :-)
>>
>>> Questo lo voglio provare anch'io :)
>>
>> Penso che aspettero' di sapere da te se funziona, prima di provarlo!!!
>> :-)
>
> Prova anche tu: è un bel po' difficile!
>
> (da
>
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/06/us/politics/house-vote-harvey-aid-debt-ceiling.html)
>
>
> WASHINGTON—PresidentTrumpstruckadealwithDemocraticcongressionallead
> ersonWednesdaytoincreasethedebtlimitandfinancethegovernmentuntilmid

Accade un fenomeno interessante: si riesce a leggere con la pronuncia
quasi perfetta anche senza capire le parole!

Per es.
President Trumps truck adeal with Democratic congression all eader
son Wednesday
si pronuncia più o meno come
President Trump struck a deal with Democratic congressional leaders
on Wednesday

Dirò di più: è più facile decifrare lo scritto ascoltandosi mentre lo si
legge che cercando di distinguere le singole parole "con gli occhi". Per
me è così almeno.

Kiuhnm
Fathermckenzie 7 Set 2017 07:15
Il 06/09/2017 15:12, ngs ha scritto:
> Il mio consiglio è di dimenticarsi delle parole e d'immaginarsi che sia
> un flusso continuo.

Questo è esattamente il problema nel listening: riuscire a stabilire
dove una parola finisce e l'altra comincia

--
Et interrogabant eum turbae dicentes: “Quid ergo faciemus?”.
Respondens autem dicebat illis: “Qui habet duas tunicas,
det non habenti; et, qui habet escas, similiter faciat”.
(Ev. sec. Lucam 3,10-11)
Fathermckenzie 7 Set 2017 07:18
Il 06/09/2017 21:51, ngs ha scritto:
>
> Accade un fenomeno interessante: si riesce a leggere con la pronuncia
> quasi perfetta anche senza capire le parole!

Io non riesco proprio a leggere

--
Et interrogabant eum turbae dicentes: “Quid ergo faciemus?”.
Respondens autem dicebat illis: “Qui habet duas tunicas,
det non habenti; et, qui habet escas, similiter faciat”.
(Ev. sec. Lucam 3,10-11)
Valerio Vanni 7 Set 2017 13:22
On Wed, 6 Sep 2017 07:31:47 -0700 (PDT),
giacomo.degliesposti@gmail.com wrote:

>> Il mio consiglio è di dimenticarsi delle parole e d'immaginarsi che sia
>> un flusso continuo.
>> Rimuovi tutti gli spazi (usa la funzione replace del tuo editor) da un
>> testo inglese e poi prova a leggerlo.
>
>In pratica porti nello scritto la stessa difficolta' del parlato,

Ne aggiungi anche una: nel pastone scritto mancano gli accenti.


--
Ci sono 10 tipi di persone al mondo: quelle che capiscono il sistema binario
e quelle che non lo capiscono.
ngs 7 Set 2017 17:01
On 07/09/2017 07:18, Fathermckenzie wrote:
> Il 06/09/2017 21:51, ngs ha scritto:
>>
>> Accade un fenomeno interessante: si riesce a leggere con la pronuncia
>> quasi perfetta anche senza capire le parole!
>
> Io non riesco proprio a leggere

Bene! Hai qualcosa su cui lavorare.

Non cercare di capire le parole e poi di pronunciarle.

Pronuncia direttamente il flusso di lettere:

PresidentTrumpstruckadealwithDemocraticcongressionallead
ersonWednesdaytoincreasethe ---->

presidentrampstracka*****lwizdemocraticongressionollidersonwendsdeytoincrisza...

Kiuhnm
giacomo.degliesposti@gmail.com 7 Set 2017 17:36
Il giorno giovedì 7 settembre 2017 13:22:28 UTC+2, Valerio Vanni ha scritto:
> On Wed, 6 Sep 2017 07:31:47 -0700 (PDT),
> giacomo.degliesposti@gmail.com wrote:
>
>>> Il mio consiglio è di dimenticarsi delle parole e d'immaginarsi che sia
>>> un flusso continuo.
>>> Rimuovi tutti gli spazi (usa la funzione replace del tuo editor) da un
>>> testo inglese e poi prova a leggerlo.
>>
>>In pratica porti nello scritto la stessa difficolta' del parlato,
>
> Ne aggiungi anche una: nel pastone scritto mancano gli accenti.

Ops, mi sono accorto solo ora che manca una frase che devo aver
cancellato inavvertitamente, senza la quale la mia risposta non
ha senso! :-o

Il messaggio doveva essere:

Altro esperimento: sostituire tutte le vocali con altrettanti '@':

In pratica porti nello scritto la stessa difficolta' del parlato,
dove molte vocali (almeno all'orecchio di un italiano) sembrano
cosi' simili fino al punto di sembrare tutti tanti '@':
H@ll@ m@ fr@nd, h@@r@@?

ciao
Giacomo
ngs 7 Set 2017 17:53
On 07/09/2017 17:36, giacomo.degliesposti@gmail.com wrote:
> Il giorno giovedì 7 settembre 2017 13:22:28 UTC+2, Valerio Vanni ha scritto:
>> On Wed, 6 Sep 2017 07:31:47 -0700 (PDT),
>> giacomo.degliesposti@gmail.com wrote:
>>
>>>> Il mio consiglio è di dimenticarsi delle parole e d'immaginarsi che sia
>>>> un flusso continuo.
>>>> Rimuovi tutti gli spazi (usa la funzione replace del tuo editor) da un
>>>> testo inglese e poi prova a leggerlo.
>>>
>>> In pratica porti nello scritto la stessa difficolta' del parlato,
>>
>> Ne aggiungi anche una: nel pastone scritto mancano gli accenti.
>
> Ops, mi sono accorto solo ora che manca una frase che devo aver
> cancellato inavvertitamente, senza la quale la mia risposta non
> ha senso! :-o
>
> Il messaggio doveva essere:
>
> Altro esperimento: sostituire tutte le vocali con altrettanti '@':
>
> In pratica porti nello scritto la stessa difficolta' del parlato,
> dove molte vocali (almeno all'orecchio di un italiano) sembrano
> cosi' simili fino al punto di sembrare tutti tanti '@':
> H@ll@ m@ fr@nd, h@@r@@?

Quello che si può fare dovrebbe essere fatto, IMHO. Non è difficile
imparare i suoni con un po' di esercizio, tipo 15 minuti al giorno. E'
pieno di esercizi di "minimal pairs" in internet.
Il problema, almeno per me, sorge solo quando le hai provate tutte e non
sai più che pesci pigliare.

Kiuhnm
ADPUF 10 Set 2017 03:24
ngs 21:45, mercoledì 6 settembre 2017:

>
onataWhiteHousemeetingcaughtRepublicanleadersoffguardandreflectedfr
>
ictionbetweenthepresidentandhisownparty.AfterweeksofcriticizingRepu
>
blicanleadersforfailingtopasslegislation,Mr.Trumpsignaledthathewasw
>
illingtocrosspartylinestoscoresomemuch-desiredlegislativevictories.
>


Senza spazi, come nelle antiche iscrizioni su pietra.

Infatti leggevano ad alta voce, lentamente.
(quelli che sapevano leggere)


--
E-S °¿°
Ho plonkato tutti quelli che postano da Google Groups!
Qui è Usenet, non è il Web!
ADPUF 10 Set 2017 03:24
Fathermckenzie 07:15, giovedì 7 settembre 2017:
> Il 06/09/2017 15:12, ngs ha scritto:
>> Il mio consiglio è di dimenticarsi delle parole e
>> d'immaginarsi che sia un flusso continuo.
>
> Questo è esattamente il problema nel listening: riuscire a
> stabilire dove una parola finisce e l'altra comincia


Però molte cose sono gruppi di parole fissi o quasi fissi in
cui cambia solo una o due.


--
E-S °¿°
Ho plonkato tutti quelli che postano da Google Groups!
Qui è Usenet, non è il Web!

Links
Giochi online
Dizionario sinonimi
Leggi e codici
Ricette
Testi
Webmatica
Hosting gratis
   
 

Studio e approfondimento della lingua inglese | Tutti i gruppi | it.cultura.linguistica.inglese | Notizie e discussioni linguistica inglese | Linguistica inglese Mobile | Servizio di consultazione news.